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What an awesome way to start our Sunday!

4ecbdf33151304f43784881b9bf4dad0“Just a quick note to introduce our gorgeous little boy!

He was born at 36w+3, is absolutely beautiful and is doing great.

I would like to say a special thank you to you all for everything, we couldn’t have received this special little boy without you! xx”

A letter from an egg donor after her final donation

Dear Nurture

I’ve just completed my fourth and probably my last donation (for the forseeable future).

Being one of your donors has been such an enriching experience and I think I’m that much of a better person for it.

I was chatting to my mum just the other day and I was raving about how awesome my skin gets – all glowy and acne free – when I’m on the injections and growing my dozen.

She asked me if that’s why I donate and I chuckled.

The conversation got a bit more intense though. She asked if I didn’t feel like I was cheating her and my dad by giving out the secret recipe so to speak.

I told her that I donated mostly because a recipe that good is worth a share. She wants grandchildren so bad…

I told her that somewhere out there, there’s a woman who wants a child just as badly. That this woman probably has a mother who wants a grandchild just as much and for a while they thought they would never get what they so desired.

Then someone told them there was a way.

It feels so good to know that I could bring happiness and a blessing to a family and that in some little way, if I decide not to have children of my own – my family’s legacy will live on. Not in the genes… but the legacy of kindness, compassion… the legacy will shine in the eyes of a mother to her child and her child to her elders.

I’m sad to close this chapter. I will definitely keep telling my friends about Nurture. And if there’s anyway I can help (minus the eggs) I would love to get involved.

x

A letter from one special donor to her recipient

Hello Wonderful Recipients!

First of all thank you both very much for my gifts. Most of all thank you for your kind words in the card. I have stuck the card up on the cupboard in my bedroom. I read it every day! I am proud of myself, this is without a doubt the most rewarding thing I have ever done!

It was the first time I had ever been under anaesthetic in my life and I was so scared of it (way too much time spent watching Greys Anatomy). My family all prayed that everything would be alright and it was.

On the morning of the retrieval I was a lot less nervous than I thought I would be.

I changed in to one of those not to attractive hospital gowns, climbed onto the bed and felt so calm and ready. I remember the anaethatist apologizing for the needle going into my arm and I laughed and said it is nothing compared to all the injections I had been giving myself.

The doctor rubbed my arm comfortingly and the next thing I was awake with a hot water bottle on my tummy and a muffin in front of me.

I gave my Mom an extra big hug from you because she really was there for me every step of the way. As soon as we got home I was ordered to the couch with a blanket and a bowl of warm oats 🙂

I am SO excited to hear about the eggs! I didn’t get any feedback so this is the first I’m hearing of it! 13 eggs! Wow!

I hope your embryo transfer goes well today. I will be thinking of you.
I can’t wait to hear good news in two weeks!

Lots of hugs and love,
Your Donor

On egg donation number five

Candace Whitehead is one of our donor angels, and we have loved working with her, and reading her blog posts about her donation. This post is taken from her her blog Down the Rabbit Hole (she’s a great blogger to follow!)

Right, so the past week has been insane on so many levels… The Oscar Pistorius story has kinda taken up a lot of emotional and mental energy (and it didn’t help that the increased traffic tanked our site for two days). But finally I get to sit down and do a bit of a catch-up on my egg donation.

As I mentioned, this donation was different – it was at a local hospital instead of the Clinic that I’ve done the previous four at. This meant a lot of things, but mostly a new team and a slightly different way of doing things. Mostly, it meant a lot more waiting than usual. After one of my scans, where I lay in the examination room in a robe for about 10 minutes before the doctor arrived, I decided to bring my Kindle to do some reading while I waited.

But otherwise, things went smoothly – bar one hilarious (okay, not really) incident where, while trying to remove an air bubble from my Lucrin shot (read more about Lucrin here), I forced the plunger down too hard and squirted about 2 units of the precious mixture out and across my bedroom. At 9pm.

I would have loved to have seen my face.

No harm done, though – the nurse in charge of my cycle let me come in for a 2 unit top-up – though I did feel terribly, terribly guilty because I felt as though I’d put everyone out.

Anyway, then it was go time. I was scheduled to check in for 7am and the wonderful X picked me up at the crack of dawn (both of us still yawning our heads off) and dropped me off.

And for the first time, I managed to snap a pic of my snazzy hospital arm band. Look at me go:

Then I was led to the day ward – oh, I wish I’d thought to take photos of it, it was such a wonderful, vintage institutional feeling place, very 1970s with the cream walls, though they did have a super cozy bedspread! – and was given a theatre gown and a robe to put on while I waited. It was very quiet – just me in the ward for the most part – and I didn’t bring anything to read, so I memorised the anaesthesia pamphlet that had been left on the bedside table instead.

Then, the anaesthetist popped by to ask me the usual questions (allergic to anything/have you had a reaction to anaesthesia before/when was your last operation/are you feeling well etc etc) and check my chest and heartrate, before I was called up to walk down the hall to where the little operating area had been set up. I was just about to go in when I met the doctor that was to perform my retrieval – not the doctor who performed my scans, oddly, but I was happy to go with it. The anaesthetist was absolutely wonderful about making me feel happy and relaxed, talking to me and teasing me a little and making sure I felt safe and comfortable. Then he warned me that “If I started feeling funny, it was just him” and I remember thinking that I felt absolutely fine – then I woke up in recovery.

I had a wonderful nurse taking care of me – though in my semi-unconscious state I managed to completely forget her name – who made sure I was well-equipped with a hot water bottle, a pot of tea and a mildly awful toasted cheese and tomato sandwich. And then the best surprise of all – my donor liaison popped round to hang out while I was recovering! In my stoned state I may have been a bit random and possibly quite annoying, but it was great chatting to her and getting a bit more of a “behind-the-scenes” look at the donation agency (who have just opened a branch in London, and it’s really interesting how differently they do things there!)

And she came bearing a gift – a charm that I am already wearing, though I will need to get a stronger chain for…

Anyway, they managed to get a pretty decent haul for my recipient – which I was quite happy with, because I was on a slightly lower protocol of the follicle stimulants than I usually am – and I should hopefully find out in the next few weeks whether or not the pregnancy was successful. Keeping fingers and toes crossed!

And so this is either my last or second-to-last donation. Either way, I’m a little sad at the thought of my journey with Nurture ending – I can’t begin to tell you how this experience has changed my life, in so many ways.

The fact that I’ve (so far) helped two women become mothers has been something that I wish I had the words for. It’s an incredible feeling, knowing that you have changed somebody’s life – undeniably.

As always, if you’re looking to donate – or if you want to become a recipient – visit the amazing (seriously, they’re amazing) women at Nurture. And feel free to either visit my previous FAQ post or ask any questions that you may have here – I’m more than happy to help answer them to the best of my ability.

A letter from a recipient to her donor

Dear Donor

I am so grateful to have been matched with you. You are special and unique, and God created you with a purpose. That purpose is to fill the emptiness and loneliness of the childless woman who is desperate and feels like a failure in life.

Being infertile is the most cruel and stressful experience. It eats you alive day and night.

I wish I could find more words to say thank you. I wish you good health and success in life. God bless you and your family.

Love your recipient